What Maxwell Smart teaches us about smarter website architecture.

When we talk about website architecture that’s focuses on the customer, you’ll often hear us say that every page is a landing page. It’s a guiding principle of marketing effectiveness, informed by the non-linear characteristics of consumer behavior. Just because something works on one page for one person doesn’t mean it’ll work on another.

Think of it like rebooting a television series.

At the peak of his career in 1965, Mel Brooks created a show about a bumbling secret agent, called Get Smart. It was definitely a product of its time, hilarious and incredibly loved while it aired.

Then came the reboot.

And we’re not talking about the 2008 film version starring Steve Carrell and Anne Hathaway. No, this one is much worse.

In 1995, FOX premiered a reboot of Get Smart starring the original cast members Don Adams, as Maxwell Smart and Barbara Feldon as Agent 99. On paper it sounds really great and it actually worked when they reprised their roles for a 1989 TV movie, but the series in 1995… flopped. Big time.

Maybe it was because Don Adams and Barbara Feldon basically functioned as a backdrop for Andy Dick, who played their son. Maybe it was the awkward attempts to sexualize the humor for a 1990’s audience. Or it could have just been the timing of it.

The series only lasted for seven episodes.

Which, would you believe, brings us back to website architecture. Much like a television series, you want each page and each version of your content to perform effectively across your website.

That’s why we like to test and retest everything.

Treating every page as a landing page ensures that each page is optimized for its intended audience, operating effectively and that none of them are a flop. So you never have to say “missed it by that much.”

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